Succulent Cornucopia

I don’t know about you but I’ve always felt awkward about cornucopias. Maybe it’s the weird name or the odd shape that have never drawn me to adorning my Thanksgiving table with one… until now. My husband had the genius idea of making a succulent filled cornucopia to replace all of my negative thoughts. 🙂 While mapping out our DIY game plan we aspired to making 100% of the project ourselves. That was until we realized that neither of us possessed the basket-weaving skills of the pilgrims and indians, so we bought the cornucopia base. Yesterday, we stayed home in our pjs and put this gem together. This is how we did it. I chose a holiday-themed color palette with shades of green, red and accents of mint. The cornucopia base used for this project measures 9 inches in diameter at the opening and about 16 inches in length. To create the internal base to build upon I used floral foam, one half-dome of wet foam (here), one half-dome of dry foam (here).

  Place the piece of wet floral foam into the base with the flat side facing out. With a butter knife, cut a “pizza slice” out of the dry foam and place aside the remaining foam for later use. Use floral wire (here) to attach the two piece of foam together. The base does not need to be beautiful, as evidenced in the photo above, because you will be adjusting and shaving away at the base as you go and it will eventually be entirely covered. If necessary, use the leftover dry foam to fill in gaps. To prep the succulents, remove all dirt from the roots. With scissors, snip the stem close to the base of the succulent and carefully insert a two to four inch piece of floral wire into the stem. Larger succulents may need two pieces of wire due to their weight. IMG_2295Now for the fun part, placing the succulents onto the base. I used two larger Echeveria ‘Doris Taylor’ succulents as my focal points. The bright green color and fuzzy texture speaks “holiday” to me. I nestled the larger succulents into the gap between the two pieces of foam to accommodate their heavier weight. As I placed the succulents on the base, I continued to shave down the base to keep the appearance of the contents cascading out of the cornucopia. Occasionally, I would create a nook in the base to nestle in a succulent that had too much natural height. If you don’t like where you have placed a succulent, remove it, the base is very forgiving. Once I placed more than half of my succulents, I went back and added some Thanksgiving-inspired fillers (here) and (here). I had these fillers leftover from my Succulent-Pumpkin Wreath. I stuck them into places where the base was still visible. I also filled in gaps with tiny succulents in the same method of carefully inserting floral wire up the stem or base of the succulent.And that’s it! I used about twenty tiny succulents, most of which were just babies attached to the larger succulents, to fill in spots once I was finished staging. Once Thanksgiving is over, you can reuse all of these succulents in either your garden or for other projects. Stay tuned to see how I repurpose these succulents for Christmas decor.

I am thankful for the ability to use my mind and my hands to be able to create the things inspired by my heart! Happy Thanksgiving!

xo, rootedinmoss

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5 thoughts on “Succulent Cornucopia

  1. Pingback: Succulent Cornucopia 2.0 | rooted in moss

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